The MultiMachine as a Roadmap

Fundamentally speaking one of the most essential components of any industrial ecosystem is the machine tool a device which is used to “fabricate metal components of machines“. Consequently the absence of a machining capacity precludes the ability of an entity (regional,national and or continent-wide) to industrialize.The question then becomes how do we effectively seed and propagate the skill of machining cheaply and pervasively? How do we Bootstrap the Industrial Age? The open source MultiMachine presents us with what could turn out to be one of the more attractive options. Wikipedia describes it as an:

…all-purpose open source machine tool that can be built inexpensively by a semi-skilled mechanic with common hand tools, from discarded car and truck parts, using only commonly available hand tools and no electricity. Its size can range from being small enough to fit in a closet to one a hundred times that size. The MultiMachine can accurately perform all the functions of an entire machine shop by itself.

Lets think about this for a minute “an all purpose machine tool that…can accurately perform all the functions of an entire machine shop” built from discarded parts by semi-skilled mechanics (replace with,jua kali workers,suame magazine fabbers etc.) What may be missing? A power source of sorts with the necessary torque and availability even in the most rural of areas.Perhaps coupling it with a system like the multifunctional platform would solve that problem.

Can we now make the assumption that all the necessary pieces are available, albeit with the expected and necessary geographic/environmental adaption needed for individual installations? Admittedly it does seem somewhat more feasible, the task at hand is too envision methods of making such systems available to those in-need fabricators.Those who may argue against the bottom-up rudimentary approach should consider this.Contrary to the perceived wisdom a considerable number of machine parts are still made in small engineering workshops, where they ultimately provide the input for larger better known industrial behemoths even in uber-industrialized Japan. Maker Faire Africa with its commitment to embedding metal hacking far and wide will do its very best place to support this approach and others like it and have fun while doing so…

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15 Responses to “The MultiMachine as a Roadmap”
  1. Pat Delany says:

    With luck I plan to attend the Faire and show 5 things:
    (1) How the Multimachine can be used to build over 20 different types of metal and woodworking tools out vehicle scrap and steel bar.
    (2) How the Multimachine can be a treadle powered, very effective metal lathe.
    (3) Alternator powered welding machines
    (4) Home made welding rods that really work.
    (5) A $1(US) hand drill that can drill a 25mm hole in a file.

    I plan to distribute a free DVD that shows how to do all this.

    I am 74 and in only fair health, I may need some help getting around!

    Pat

  2. Eric Hughes says:

    What’s Up Emeka? I’m a Huge Fan Of Timbuktu Chronicles. I’m very excited about your vision & perspectives regarding African Countries & sustainable technological development. Like you I’m Based in America but is tired of the Negative reporting about African Countries coming out of the Mainstream Media. I’m Hungry for Fresh Ideas and information about Africa. Keep up the good work. As for the importance of Machine Tool manufacturing, it’s absolutely vital for countries to have machining capabilities to build an industrial foundation. I’m From Detroit the epicenter of the Industrial age in America. So I’m acutely aware of the importance of continued development in this area. Preferably from the ground up. It’s more important for Africans to began this way, because the important thing to focus on is the knowledge acquisition. Rather than simply buying tooling equipment from Europe, America, or Asia. I’d like to see Africans design & build According to the Needs of Africa & Africans.

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  1. […] This post was Twitted by emeka_okafor – Real-url.org […]

  2. […] The MultiMachine as a Roadmap | Maker Faire Africa – Aug 14th – 16th, Accra, Ghana "Fundamentally speaking one of the most essential components of any industrial ecosystem is the machine tool a device which is used to “fabricate metal components of machines“. Consequently the absence of a machining capacity precludes the ability of an entity (regional,national and or continent-wide) to industrialize.The question then becomes how do we effectively seed and propagate the skill of machining cheaply and pervasively? How do we Bootstrap the Industrial Age? The open source MultiMachine presents us with what could turn out to be one of the more attractive options." (tags: sustainability open source engineering development) […]

  3. […] The MultiMachine as a Roadmap […]

  4. […] Delaney, of Multimachine fame, is coming. This is an, “all-purpose open source machine tool that can be built […]

  5. […] holes in it and an old/broken engine block, and create a universal machine tool. His is called the Multimachine. Due to weight constraints he couldn’t bring a complete machine, so he brought the […]

  6. […] Delaney, the designer of the MultiMachine, has been tinkering with an idea for the design of a cheap lathe made out of concrete and scrap for […]

  7. […] The MultiMachine as a Roadmap Share this: Pin ItLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. Makers in this post:Pat Delany – Palestine, TX […]



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